Loving Books in a Dark Age : Longreads Blog

I always loved reading Bede. It seems to me that the dark ages was one of the most interesting times. People like Bede invented modern science pretty much from scratch.

In the “dark ages” of Europe, people began reading silently to themselves, and a love of books and learning took hold, pioneered by Bede.

Source: Loving Books in a Dark Age : Longreads Blog

 


Watch the very first film version of ‘Alice in Wonderland’ from 1903 | Dangerous Minds

Cecil Hepworth is one of the unsung heroes of early cinema. The son of a magic-lantern showman and novelist, Hepworth was one of the first producers/directors to realize the potential of making full-length “feature films” (his version of David Copperfield in 1913 ran for 67 minutes) and the selling power of star actors (and animals—most notably his pet dog in Rescued by Rover in 1905)

Source: Watch the very first film version of ‘Alice in Wonderland’ from 1903 | Dangerous Minds

 


BBC – BBC Arts – Seven Hanged: The book that started World War One

How did Seven Hanged, an obscure Russian novel, help to kickstart WW1?

Source: BBC – BBC Arts – Seven Hanged: The book that started World War One

 


If you’re alive in 30 years, chances are good you may also be alive in 1000 years

Sounds unlikely? It’s not – it’s actually quite likely.

The only way to get people to live for a thousand years or more is to develop advanced technologies that can manipulate our bodies down to the cellular and molecular level. So the question is whether humanity will develop the necessary technologies over the next 30 years, or not. Personally, I think it’s very close to 100% certain that we’ll manage to do this.

 

Source: If you’re alive in 30 years, chances are good you may also be alive in 1000 years

 


3,900 Pages of Paul Klee’s Personal Notebooks Are Now Online, Presenting His Bauhaus Teachings (1921-1931) | Open Culture

Paul Klee led an artistic life that spanned the 19th and 20th centuries, but he kept his aesthetic sensibility tuned to the future.

Source: 3,900 Pages of Paul Klee’s Personal Notebooks Are Now Online, Presenting His Bauhaus Teachings (1921-1931) | Open Culture

 


DOD officials say autonomous killing machines deserve a look

While military requires person in loop, robots might decide when to shoot in future.

Source: DOD officials say autonomous killing machines deserve a look

 


Sculpted in Steel: Artful construction of automobiles – CNN.com

The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston will exhibit 17 stunning vehicles made during the Art Deco period.

Source: Sculpted in Steel: Artful construction of automobiles – CNN.com

 


Mystery in Miniature by Christopher Benfey | NYR Daily | The New York Review of Books

Miniature is one of the refuges of greatness. — Gaston Bachelard

Source: Mystery in Miniature by Christopher Benfey | NYR Daily | The New York Review of Books

 


Anton Chekhov, 58 items from his notebooks

When I become rich, I shall have a harem in which I shall keep fat naked women, with their buttocks painted green.

Source: Anton Chekhov, 58 items from his notebooks

 


The Man and The Dog – FATH – YouTube

Touching

 


Lobby Cards: Little Pieces of Vintage Cinema

Long before IMDB and YouTube, film studios promoted movies on posters and pieces of heavy stock paper known as lobby cards. As movie production took off in the early 1900s, what’s known as the Golden Age of movie posters was born. According to West Hollywood film ephemera dealer Walter Reuben, early movie posters, often illustrated with bright colors and bold design, inspired the creation of lobby cards, a smaller, more durable alternative to their large and flimsy predecessors. Typically measuring 14×11″, lobby cards were displayed and distributed to movie-goers in theaters. Printed in sets of eight to 12, the cards featured various iconic scenes of the film, or colorful illustrations of the movie title and the names of leading actors and actresses. Lobby cards are rarely seen today, but remain highly sought after by collectors of movie ephemera.

Source: Lobby Cards: Little Pieces of Vintage Cinema

 


Maps made by George Washington, longtime surveyor and cartographer.

George Washington studied surveying, practiced it on familiar lands owned by his family, and was appointed as official surveyor of Culpeper County, Virginia, by the young age of 17. The maps below, which date from different phases of Washington’s lifelong involvement with surveying and cartography, are from the collection of the Library of Congress. “Throughout his life as a soldier, planter, businessman, land speculator, farmer, military officer, and president,” writes the Library’s Edward Redmond, “Washington relied on and benefitted from his knowledge of maps.”

Source: Maps made by George Washington, longtime surveyor and cartographer.

 


New Databases Offer Insights Into the Lives of Escaped Slaves – The New York Times

When slaves fled American and British farms and townhouses, their owners often placed detailed newspaper ads offering rewards to anyone who returned the fugitives. The written notices described the runaway slaves’ mannerisms, clothes, hairstyles, skin markings, teeth and skills, as well as information about plantations that the escapees might have tried to reach, hoping to reunite with family members or less cruel past owners.

Source: New Databases Offer Insights Into the Lives of Escaped Slaves – The New York Times

 


The Unsuitability of English – Lingua Franca – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“Utrecht, Holland— My mission in this pleasant central Holland town: giving a keynote address at the 25th anniversary conference of Sense (originally the Society of English-Native-Speaking Editors, now a general professional organization of anglophone editors in the Netherlands) in the palatial surroundings of the beautifully restored 16th-century Paushuize (pictured). Knowing that the editors and translators who belong to Sense are much concerned with the international character of English, I chose to speak about the global role that the English language has taken on. And I stressed that English doesn’t deserve its role, linguistically: In many ways it is a terrible choice for a world language.”

Source: The Unsuitability of English – Lingua Franca – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




 
Blogroll
archives
categories
recent